Tag Archives: fannie mae

Home Purchase Sentiment Index Drops Again

Consumers Say Now is a Good Time to Buy or Sell a Home

(November 9, 2016) – WASHINGTON, DC – The Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index® (HPSI) dipped 1.1 points to 81.7 in October, the third decrease in as many months. Four of the six components that comprise the HPSI fell during the month. The share of consumers reporting significantly higher income over the past year experienced the largest drop, decreasing eight percentage points on net. The net share of consumers expecting home prices to go up in the next year fell three percentage points, and those who expect mortgage rates to drop and those who are confident about not losing their job each dropped by one percentage point in October. However, more consumers said they believe now is a good time to buy and a good time to sell a home – increasing two and four points on net, respectively.

“The HPSI fell in October for the third straight month from its record high in July, reaching the lowest level since March. Recent erosion in sentiment likely reflects, in part, enhanced uncertainty facing consumers today,” said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. “Since July, more consumers, on net, have steadily expected mortgage rates to rise and home price appreciation to moderate. Furthermore, consumers’ perception of their income over the past year deteriorated sharply in October to the worst showing since early 2013, weighing on the index. However, this component of the HPSI is volatile from month to month, and the firming trend in wage gains from the October jobs report, if sustained, may foreshadow an improving view in the near future.”

Source: Fannie Mae news release.

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Home Purchase Sentiment Index Moves Up in 2015

Index Closes Year on Positive Note Driven by Reported Income Growth

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(c) Can Stock Photo(January 7, 2016) –  Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index™ (HPSI) increased 2.4 points to 83.2 in December, capping off its strongest year thus far, as Americans’ household income prospects bounced back to levels of three months ago. The share of consumers who reported that their income was significantly higher than it was 12 months ago climbed 9 percentage points on net in December, while those who were unconcerned about losing their job rose 3 percentage points on net. Coupled with an improved financial outlook, more consumers said they believe now is a good time to sell a home – climbing 4 percentage points on net – although the share who believe now is a good time to buy remained flat in December.

“Consumers ended the year on an improved note with regard to their income, job security, and overall economic outlook. This more positive consumer sentiment brought the HPSI up a few points, moving the index up for all of 2015,” said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. “Brightening economic prospects, if sustained, should stimulate demand for homeownership. However, continuing upward pressure on rental prices and constrained housing supply, particularly for starter homes, may mean prospective first-time homebuyers could face affordability constraints.”

COMPONENT HIGHLIGHTS

Fannie Mae’s December 2015 Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI) rose 2.4 percentage points in December to 83.2. Overall, consumer sentiment about personal finances and the direction of the economy has improved since last month. Four of the six HPSI components increased in December: Household Income, Good Time to Sell, Job Security, and Home Prices. Mortgage Rate net expectations fell by 4 points, while the net share of respondents who said it is a Good Time to Buy remained at 35 percent. Overall, the HPSI is up 1.9 points since this time last year.

  • The net share of respondents who say that it is a good time to buy a house remained flat at 35%.
  • The net percentage of respondents who say it is a good time to sell a house rose after falling for two months in a row – rising 4 percentage points to 8% in December.
  • The net share of respondents who say that home prices will go up rose 2 percentage points to 40%.
  • The net share of those who say mortgage interest rates will go down continued to decrease, dropping 4 percentage points to negative 52%.
  • The net share of respondents who say they are not concerned with losing their job rose 3 percentage points to 72%. 85% of respondents say they are not concerned about losing their job, tying an all-time survey high.
  • The net share of respondents who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago rose 9 percentage points to 15%.

ABOUT FANNIE MAE’S HOME PURCHASE SENTIMENT INDEX

The Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI) distills information about consumers’ home purchase sentiment from Fannie Mae’s National Housing Survey (NHS) into a single number. The HPSI reflects consumers’ current views and forward-looking expectations of housing market conditions and complements existing data sources to inform housing-related analysis and decision making. The HPSI is constructed from answers to six NHS questions that solicit consumers’ evaluations of housing market conditions and address topics that are related to their home purchase decisions. The questions ask consumers whether they think that it is a good or bad time to buy or to sell a house, what direction they expect home prices and mortgage interest rates to move, how concerned they are about losing their jobs, and whether their incomes are higher than they were a year earlier.

(Source: Fannie Mae)

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com.

 All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained by third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

Fannie Mae Announces 97 Percent LTV Option for First-Time Homebuyers

3 percentdownpayment (Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd) –  Today, Fannie Mae (FNMA/OTC) announced an option for qualified first-time homebuyers that will allow for a down payment as low as three percent.  Building upon Fannie Mae’s successful lower down payment program offered through state Housing Finance Agencies, the 97 percent loan-to-value ratio (LTV) option will expand access to credit for qualified first-time homebuyers that may not have the resources for a larger down payment. These loans will meet Fannie Mae’s usual eligibility requirements, including underwriting, income documentation and risk management standards. These loans will require private mortgage insurance or other risk sharing, as is required on purchase loans acquired by the company with greater than 80 percent LTV.

“Our goal is to help additional qualified borrowers gain access to mortgages,” said Andrew Bon Salle, Fannie Mae Executive Vice President for Single Family Underwriting, Pricing and Capital Markets. “This option alone will not solve all the challenges around access to credit. Our new 97 percent LTV offering is simply one way we are working to remove barriers for creditworthy borrowers to get a mortgage. We are confident that these loans can be good business for lenders, safe and sound for Fannie Mae and an affordable, responsible option for qualified borrowers.”

With today’s announcement, homebuyers can purchase a home under Fannie Mae’s standard offering or its My Community Mortgage® product with a three percent down payment if at least one co-borrower is a first-time buyer. In addition, eligible homeowners who wish to refinance their Fannie Mae-owned mortgage but do not qualify under the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) can refinance their loan up to the 97 percent LTV level under a limited cash-out option. Lenders must use Fannie Mae’s Desktop Underwriter® tool when evaluating mortgage applications for this product. Today’s announcement can be found here.

Fannie Mae has implemented prudent risk management practices to ensure that loans the company acquires are appropriately underwritten, including mortgages with lower down payments. These include essentially eliminating risk-layering on purchase money loans, requiring income documentation to avoid “low-doc” or “no-doc” lending, and requiring income verification.

As noted, private capital will be in the first loss position. Mortgage insurers and other risk sharing partners will have to conclude that these loans are prudent to make in order for these loans to be originated and delivered to Fannie Mae in the secondary market.

Fannie Mae has also worked to provide lenders with greater clarity on what circumstances would result in a loan repurchase request. Some lenders have said that uncertainty around these requests has led to them curtailing mortgage availability. This new clarity is intended to help lenders make mortgages to more creditworthy borrowers.

In addition, Fannie Mae is making new tools available to help lenders better evaluate risk on loans. For example, early in 2015 the company will offer Collateral Underwriter®, which gives lenders access to the same appraisal review tool that Fannie Mae uses. Collateral Underwriter will be offered at no additional cost to Fannie Mae’s customers.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com.

  This article was published on December 9, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained by third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.