Tag Archives: get a license

How Long Does it Take to get an Oregon Real Estate License

(Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd) – To get an Oregon real estate broker license, the licensee applicant will have to complete 150-hour Oregon Real Estate Agency approved pre-license course of study consisting of seven individual courses. In Oregon, these courses can be delivered by live-lecture or online. Regardless of the delivery method, the applicant should plan on a minimum of 150 clock hours to complete the course. One of the many advantages of online delivery over live-lecture delivery is that the online student can spend as much time studying the course as convenient. For example, studying online for 10 hours per day means the student will finish the course in as little as 15 days.

###

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com.

  This article was published on April 17, 2015. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained by third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

Make sure your contracting business doesn’t work for free!

Your contractor’s license is the most important first step.

In California, a contractor was recently ordered to repay over $750,000 when it became evident that the company had operated without being properly licensed in the state of California. In Oregon, a contractor has been barred from seeking over $285,000 in compensation when his license was suspended during the course of a contract.  Don’t let this happen to your contracting business! OnlineEd will tell you what the risks are, and what you can do to mitigate them.

In a 2012 court decision, a California constructing contractor was ordered to repay the entire $750,000 contract earned while performing work while unlicensed.  The sole proprietor was contracted to construct a temporary access road and parking lot for a casino. After submitting a bid in March 2007, the contracting company finished its work and was paid in full around May. However, an application for a license was submitted while work was ongoing, and the contracting company first received its contractor’s license in October 2007.  The court subsequently ruled that the company be required to refund all of the money paid by the client  upon completion of the contract.

While harsh, this action is consistent with California courts’ previous decisions that contractors should be held liable for their licensure to the point of being denied payment or being required to refund payment already received.

Similar legislation is in place in Oregon, and can be seen in another 2012 court decision which upheld a ruling barring a contractor from commencing action seeking compensation earned while operating without being properly licensed. While constructing a residence, the contractor’s license to perform construction work was suspended for two weeks because of expired liability insurance. Because of this suspension, the court held that the contractor was unable to seek compensation allegedly owed to him through legal means, losing out on an amount over $280,000.

These worst-case scenarios are cautionary tales, but they should not be ignored. Licensure costs time and money to obtain, but the alternative is far more expensive. Making sure that your contracting business is properly licensed throughout the entire process – from bid to completion – will protect your business from substantial losses. OnlineEd.com can help with your Oregon contractor needs here.

Once you have obtained or renewed your license, make sure you fulfill all of the continuing requirements to avoid a suspension. The CCB lists some common mistakes and oversights that can cause your license to be suspended:

  • Expired liability insurance.
  • Cancellation of your bond.
  • Hiring employees while in an “exempt” employer status
  • Deletion of RMI (Responsible Managing Individual) form due to disassociation or death.
  • License or renewal fees returned as “insufficient” or other non-payment issues.
  • Maintaining a non-exempt status with no workers’ compensation.
  • Failure to maintain your corporate or LLC (Limited Liability Company) filing.

 

Make the most of your business; ensure you are properly licensed and continue to double-check your license frequently. Don’t get caught in a mistake and end up working for free!

###

For more information on obtaining an Oregon contractor license, please visit the OnlinEed web site at: www.OnlineEd.com or give them a call at 866.519.9597

EPA Takes Action Against Violators of the Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule

(EPA – WASHINGTON, D.C.) – Today, EPA announced 17 enforcement actions for violations of the Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting rule (RRP).

The RRP rule protects homeowners and tenants from dangerous lead dust that can be left behind after common renovation, repair, and painting work. It requires that contractors and subcontractors be properly trained and certified, and use lead-safe work practices to ensure that lead dust is minimized. Lead exposure can cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities to seizures and death, putting young children at the greatest risk because their nervous systems are still developing.

“Using lead-safe work practices is good business and it’s the law,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “EPA is taking action to enforce lead rules to protect people from exposure to lead and to ensure a level playing field for contractors that follow the rules.”

The enforcement actions address serious violations of the RRP rule, including fourteen actions where the contractor failed to obtain certification prior to performing or offering to perform renovation activities on pre-1978 homes, where lead is more likely to be present. Other alleged violations included failure to follow the lead-safe work practices, which are critical to reducing exposure to lead-based paint hazards.

The 17 enforcement actions listed below include 14 administrative settlements assessing civil penalties of up to $23,000. These settlements also required the contractors to certify that they had come into compliance with the requirements of the RRP rule. Additionally, EPA filed three administrative complaints seeking civil penalties of up to the statutory maximum of $37,500 per violation. As required by the Toxic Substances Control Act, a company or individual’s ability to pay a penalty is evaluated and penalties are adjusted accordingly.GTON – Today, EPA announced 17 enforcement actions for violations of the Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting rule (RRP).

The RRP rule protects homeowners and tenants from dangerous lead dust that can be left behind after common renovation, repair, and painting work. It requires that contractors and subcontractors be properly trained and certified, and use lead-safe work practices to ensure that lead dust is minimized. Lead exposure can cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities to seizures and death, putting young children at the greatest risk because their nervous systems are still developing.

“Using lead-safe work practices is good business and it’s the law,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “EPA is taking action to enforce lead rules to protect people from exposure to lead and to ensure a level playing field for contractors that follow the rules.”

The enforcement actions address serious violations of the RRP rule, including fourteen actions where the contractor failed to obtain certification prior to performing or offering to perform renovation activities on pre-1978 homes, where lead is more likely to be present. Other alleged violations included failure to follow the lead-safe work practices, which are critical to reducing exposure to lead-based paint hazards.

The 17 enforcement actions listed below include 14 administrative settlements assessing civil penalties of up to $23,000. These settlements also required the contractors to certify that they had come into compliance with the requirements of the RRP rule. Additionally, EPA filed three administrative complaints seeking civil penalties of up to the statutory maximum of $37,500 per violation. As required by the Toxic Substances Control Act, a company or individual’s ability to pay a penalty is evaluated and penalties are adjusted accordingly.

###

More about lead and instructions on getting certified: www.epa.gov/lead

More about becoming an Oregon licensed contractor: https://www.onlineed.com/info/Contracting/Oregon/LicenseTraining/

How To Get An Oregon Principal Broker License When Licensed In Another State

Oregon

Oregon

 (Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd® – Portland, OR) If you have a real estate license in any other state and want to become an Oregon principal broker, you will need to meet the following qualifications and requirements. The Oregon principal broker license is the license given to supervise other Oregon real estate licensees or to those who don’t wish to be supervised. Note that Oregon has a real estate broker license and a real estate principal broker license. Oregon does not have a real estate salesperson license. In states having broker and salesperson licenses, Oregon’s principal broker license will be equivalent to the real estate broker license.

 

Qualifications

  1. Principal broker applicants must have three years of active licensed real estate experience: Out-of-state experience must be verified by a certified licensing history document, dated within the past year, from the state agency responsible for licensing real estate persons in that state and must show the actual period of time the out-of-state license was active. If an applicant does not meet any of the standard experience requirement options for principal broker licensing but has other real estate-related experience and/or education, a waiver of the required experience may be requested from the Oregon Real Estate Board;
  2. Be at least 18 years of age; and
  3. Have a high school diploma or equivalent.

If you meet the above qualifications you must complete the following steps :

  • Enroll in the OnlineEd® Oregon Real Estate Agency approved 150-hour Oregon Real Estate Broker Pre-License Course;
  • Make application for your Oregon license through the Oregon Real Estate Agency’s online license application and management system; pay the $230 license fee; and submit a certified license history from the state holding your active real estate license.
  • Complete your Real Estate Broker pre-license course;
  • Enroll in the OnlineEd® Oregon Real Estate Agency Approved 40-hour Brokerage Administration and Sales Supervision (“BASS”) course, aka: The Principal Broker Course;
  •  Confirm with OnlineEd® that application for your license has been made by providing us with the applicant ID number given by the Oregon Real Estate Agency when they acknowledged your application;
  • Complete the BASS course;
  • Receive acknowledgement from OnlineEd® that you have been made eligible with the exam proctor for the principal broker licensing exam;
  • Register and pay for the principal broker license exam through the exam proctor’s web site or by telephone;
  • At the exam site, pay for and submit fingerprints for a background check;
  • When your background check is cleared, choose to work for another principal broker or on your own. If on your own, under your own name, log into the license management system and select “Operate Under my Own License” and complete the process. If on your own, under a registered business name, log in and select “Registered Business Name Application,” complete the process and pay the fee. If working for another principal broker, that principal broker will need to log in to the license management system and associate you with his/her business.

 ###

  OnlineEd® is Oregon Real Estate Agency approved provider number 1038 and an Oregon licensed vocational school offering real estate, mortgage, contractor, and insurance licensing and continuing education courses.

For more information about OnlineEd®, please visit www.OnlineEd.com or telephone 503.670.9278