Tag Archives: oregon real estate agency

Oregon Real Estate Agency Raises Licensing Fees

Oregon license renewal fees increased for 2018

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 17, 2018)

(Portland, Ore – OnlineEd®)

Activity Old Fee New Fee
Apply for a new real estate license $230 $300
Renew an active real estate license $230 $300
Late renewal of an active real estate license $260 ($230 + $30 late fee) $450 ($300 + $150 late fee)
Renew an inactive real estate license $110 $150
Reactivate an inactive license $75 $150
Issuance of a temporary license $40 $150
Extension of a temporary license $40 $150
Licensee name changes $10 $10
Transfer of licenses between registered businesses names $10 $10
Initial registration of a business name $230 $300
Renewal of a registered business name N/A $50
Change of a registered business name N/A $300
Registration of a branch office $10 $50

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Continuing Education for Oregon Real Estate License Renewal

How to renew an Oregon estate broker, principal broker, or property manager license with the Oregon Real Estate Agency

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(December 29, 2017)

 

cropped-Logo_O_512_512.jpg  (PORTLAND-OR) OnlineEd – To renew an Oregon real estate license (broker, principal broker, or property manager) the licensee must pay a renewal fee and meet continuing education requirements.

Continuing Education Requirements

  • 30 hours of continuing education are required during the two years preceding license renewal;
  • At least 3 of the 30 hours must be in a course on recent changes in real estate rule and law, called the Law and Rule Required Course (LARRC);
  • A licensee renewing a license for the first time must take a Real Estate Board-approved 27-hour course on Broker Advanced Practices and a 3-hour course on recent changes in real estate rule and law (LARRC);
  • Continuing education courses, along with course objectives, must come from the Real Estate Board approved topics;
  • Continuing education must be provided by an Oregon Real Estate Agency approved Certified Continuing Education Provider to be eligible. OnlineEd is Certified Education Provider 1038;
  • The Certified Continuing Education Provider must ensure that persons who teach continuing education courses meet certain instructor qualification requirements; and
  • As part of the license renewal process, licensees will self-certify that they have met the continuing education requirement for the applicable renewal cycle.
  • While courses might be delivered by approved providers, it is still the licensee’s responsibility to see that the courses meet timing requirements and that the provider can prove the licensee’s time in the course to the Agency. This means that online courses must have timers and live lecture courses must have a method in place to verify time spent in attendance. A provider’s certificate of completion issued when the provider cannot prove time spent in the course will not be counted if discovered during an agency audit.

Eligible Course Topics

At least 3 of the 30 hours must be from a course on recent changes in real estate rule. The course on the recent rule and law changes is known as Law and Rule Required Course, commonly known by its acronym LARRC (“lark”). The remaining 27 hours of continuing education can come from any of these topics:

  • Principal broker or property manager record keeping
  • Principal real estate broker supervision responsibilities
  • Principal broker or property manager client trust accounts
  • Agency relationships and responsibilities for brokers, principal brokers, or property managers
  • Misrepresentation in real estate transactions
  • Property management
  • Advertising regulations
  • Real estate disclosure requirements
  • Real estate consumer protection
  • Anti-trust issues in real estate transactions
  • Commercial real estate
  • Real estate contracts
  • Real estate taxation
  • Real estate property evaluation, appraisal, or valuation
  • Fair Housing laws or policy
  • Managing a real estate brokerage
  • Business ethics
  • Risk management
  • Dispute resolution
  • Real estate finance
  • Real estate title
  • Real estate escrows
  • Real estate development
  • Condominiums
  • Subdivisions
  • Unit owner or homeowner associations
  • Timeshares
  • Water rights
  • Environmental protection issues in real estate
  • Land use planning, zoning, or other public limitations on use
  • Real estate economics
  • Real estate law or regulation
  • Negotiation

Specifically excluded from eligible continuing education are courses about these topics:

  • Real estate broker or property manager pre-licensing courses
  • Examination preparation classes
  • Sales meetings
  • Motivational classes or seminars
  • Time management classes or seminars
  • Sales and marketing classes or seminars
  • Psychology classes or seminars
  • Trade association orientation courses
  • Courses in standardized computer software programs not specifically related to one of the eligible topics
  • Courses with content that is specific to another state or jurisdiction

Certified Continuing Education Providers

For continuing education to qualify for license renewal, the education must be delivered by a Certified Continuing Education Provider. To qualify as a Certified Continuing Education Provider, the applicant must be one of the following:

  • An Oregon Real Estate Agency registered business name. Eligible applicants are a principal real estate broker or real estate property manager who conducts business under a registered business name.

A real estate trade association or a trade association in a related field but not the individual members of those associations. A “real estate trade association” is defined as a local, state, regional, or national organization with members that include real estate licensees.

A “trade association in a related field” means a local, state, regional, or national organization with members including, but not limited to, a certified or registered:

  • Private career school approved by the REA. A private career school means a school licensed by the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission and approved by the REA to provide the 150-hour real estate license applicant course of study, the 60-hour property manager license applicant course, or both.
  • Distance-learning provider approved by the REA, which means a person whose course has been certified by the Association of Real Estate License Law Officials (ARELLO).
  • Appraisers, architects, attorneys, contractors, professional engineers, and tax professionals

A provider who does not meet one of the listed qualifications to become a certified continuing education provider may petition the Real Estate Board for approval. Once approved as a certified continuing education provider, the provider must:

  • ensure that a course offered is within the scope of one or more of the eligible course topics;
  • identify to the licensee which course topic the course covers;
  • ensure that the course meets the minimum length requirement of one credit hour (50 minutes);
  • assign each course a four-digit number that is unique to that course;
  • ensure that courses offered will meet the stated learning objective requirements;
  • ensure that the instructor who teaches a continuing education course meets the applicable instructor qualification requirements;
  • give each licensee who completes a course a course completion certificate; and
  • keep records of each course provided for three years.

Online License Renewal

Once the continuing education requirement is met and to renew a real estate license, licensees are required to use the REA’s online renewal system known as e-License. Real estate licenses cannot be renewed through the US mail.

During the online renewal, licensees are asked to certify that they have completed their required continuing education requirements. As part of their certification process, licensees will submit the information necessary to complete their renewal that is found on each certificate. Additionally, certificates must be kept by the licensee for three years after the renewal date for which the certificate was used for continuing education credit.

The REA’s eLicensing website is: https://orea.elicense.irondata.com

The REA required information to be included on all qualifying continuing education course certificates includes:

  • the licensee’s name and license number;
  • the REA certified course provider’s name and REA provider number;
  • the course name and identification number. This course identification number is a four-digit provider number assigned by REA, followed by the 4-digit course number assigned by the provider and registered with the REA;
  • the date, location, and length of time assigned to the course;
  • the eligible course topics covered, or whether the course is the three-hour Law and Rule Required Course, the Property Manager or Broker Advanced Practices Course, or the Brokerage Administration and Sales Supervision course; and
  • the name of the instructor.

Click here visit a list of approved continuing education courses.

Click here to enroll in the FREE 3-hour approved Law and Rule Required Course, LARRC.

OnlineEd® is an Oregon Real Estate Agency Certified Continuing Education Course Provider No. 1038.

 

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Do You Need an Oregon Real Estate License?

canstockphoto7389305 real estate license card  (Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd) –  Anyone who conducts professional real estate activity within the State of Oregon is required to have a real estate license. Oregon defines professional real estate activity as any of the following actions, when engaged in for another and for compensation or in the expectation or upon the promise of receiving or collecting compensation, by any person who:

  • sells, exchanges, purchases, rents or leases real estate;
  • offers to sell, exchange, purchase, rent or lease real estate;
  • negotiates, offers, attempts or agrees to negotiate the sale, exchange, purchase, rental or leasing of real estate;
  • lists, offers, attempts or agrees to list real estate for sale;
  • offers, attempts or agrees to perform or provide a competitive market analysis or letter opinion, to represent a taxpayer under ORS 305 or 309 or to give an opinion in any administrative or judicial proceeding regarding the value of real estate for taxation, except when the activity is performed by a state certified appraiser or state licensed appraiser;
  • auctions, offers, attempts or agrees to auction real estate;
  • buys, sells, offers to buy or sell or otherwise deals in options on real estate;
  • engages in management or rental real estate;
  • purports to be engaged in the business of buying, selling, exchanging, renting or leasing real estate;
  • assists or directs in the procuring of prospects, calculated to result in the sale, exchange, leasing or rental of real estate;
  • expect as otherwise provided in ORS 696 advises, counsels, consults or analyzes in connection with real estate values, sales or dispositions, including dispositions through eminent domain procedures;
  • advises, counsels, consults or analyzes in connection with the acquisition or sale of real estate by an entity if the purpose of the entity is investment in real estate; or
  • performs real estate marketing activity ad described in ORS 696.

While exemptions to licensing can be found in ORS 696.030, the Oregon Real Estate Agency will not say if an exemption applies to a certain situation. Anyone who thinks they might qualify for such an exemption should consult their attorney.

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This article was published on September 10, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained by third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate and mortgage brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com.

If You Are Licensed in Another State and Want to Become an Oregon Principal Broker

canstockphoto7389305 real estate license card(Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd) If you want to become an Oregon Principal Broker but are not currently licensed in Oregon, you must meet these qualifications:

  • Be 18 years old;
  • Have a high school diploma, GED or international equivalent; and
  • Have three years of active real estate license experience.

If you qualify, you must complete these steps:

  • Complete the OnlineEd Out-of-State Principal Broker Course Bundle, containing the required 150-hour broker pre-license course and the 40-hour principal broker qualifying education course.
  • Complete a Real Estate License Application in eLicense, the Agency’s online license management system. When the application is processed, you will receive an applicant ID number.
  • Pay the $230 license application fee in eLicense.
  • Submit to the Agency a certified license history from the state where you obtained your active real estate license experience.
  • Register and pay for principal broker license exam with the state selected licensing exam proctor.
  • Pass the principal broker license exam.
  • Pay for and submit fingerprints for background check while at the state licensing exam testing center.
  • Once your background check has cleared, choose to work for another principal broker or on your own

If you have additional questions about the course or licensing process, please telephone Chris Culbertson in our enrollment information office at 503.670.9278 or send him an email to chris@onlineed.com.

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 OnlineEd® is Oregon Real Estate Agency Approved Pre-License and Continuing Education School and an Oregon Licensed Vocational School under the Oregon Department of Education. For more information about OnlineEd, please visit www.OnlineEd.com.

 This article was published on August 7, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate and mortgage brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com.

For more information about our post-licensing training, please visit our Power Up! information page.

Oregon Real Estate Agency to Require More CE Information to be Reported During Renewal Process

(Oregon Real Estate Agency – Salem, OR) Starting May 1, 2014, the Oregon Real Estate Agency will require active real estate licensees to provide continuing education course information electronically in eLicense during license renewal.

Beginning May 1, 2014, licensees will be required to enter information for each class they took in the two years prior to the active license renewal. The required information includes:

  • Provider number
  • Course name
  • Course number
  • Eligible course topic
  • Date of course completion
  • Course location
  • Instructor Name
  • Number of course hours

This information is found on the Certificates of Attendance issued by certified continuing education providers. Do not send certificates to the Agency unless specifically requested.

 

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This article was published on April 3, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com. OnlineEd is Oregon Approved Education Provider No. 1038.

Green Home Building Continues to Climb, Valued at $36 Billion in 2013

canstockphoto16053461(National Association of Home Builders) – February 4, 2014 – McGraw Hill Construction, a part of McGraw Hill Financial (NYSE: MHFI), today released findings from a new Green Home Builders and Remodelers Study at the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) International Builders’ Show in Las Vegas. Green homes comprised 23% of the overall residential construction market in 2013 and are expected to grow to between 26% and 33% of the market by 2016. This equates to a doubling in the value of green home construction over three years, growing from $36 billion in 2013 to $83-$105 billion in 2016, based on the current McGraw Hill Construction forecast for total residential construction.

According to McGraw Hill Construction research dating back to 2006, the green home building market most rapidly accelerated during the housing downturn when builders experienced in green remained in business at higher proportions than those not knowledgeable about energy-efficient and green home building. As the residential market improves, indications are that the residential market is becoming bifurcated, with green builders accelerating the depth of their green work, and new or returned entrants into the market focusing on traditional construction practices.

“Green experience was a significant part of what kept builders in business during the recession,” said Harvey M. Bernstein, VP of Industry Insights and Alliances, McGraw Hill Construction, “and now, those same firms are embracing the competitive advantage they earned by deepening their delivery of energy-efficient and green homes. We also see firms reentering the market that are using traditional home building practices versus green practices because that’s what they know. However, the broader availability of green building products and practices, a more educated consumer and an increase in activity at the regulatory level will also encourage this group of builders to learn green practices over time.”

The study shows that the top drivers to increased green home building activity include changes in codes and regulations, better quality, wider availability and affordability of green products, energy costs, and competitive advantage.

The green home building study, produced by McGraw Hill Construction in conjunction with the NAHB, is the fourth in a series that dates back to 2006. It was designed to provide key insights into market opportunities, backed by proprietary research surveys and the power of the Dodge database. The study reveals business benefits afforded by green building:

– Competitive marketing advantage: 51% of builders and remodelers find that it is easier to market green homes, up from 46% in 2012 and 40% in 2008.

– Customer willingness to pay for green features:

o 68% of builders (up from 61% in 2011) report their customers will pay more for green, with 23% reporting that their customer will pay more than 5%

o 84% of remodelers report the same (up from 66% in 2011), with 55% reporting their customers will pay more than 5% for green features.

“This study shows that more and more builders are incorporating environmentally sensitive and energy and resource efficient techniques into traditional home building practices, and we expect to see even stronger growth in the coming years,” said Matt Belcher Co-Chair of NAHB’s Energy & Green Building Subcommittee and a Builder from Wildwood, MO. “Green building expertise provided builders and remodelers with a competitive advantage during the housing downturn, and now as the market continues to recover, NAHB members stand ready to meet the increased demand.”

In 2013, 16% of builders were dedicated to green building with more than 90% of their projects green, and another 20% were highly invested in green activity with 61% to 90% of their projects green. By 2015, that is expected to increase, with 20% of builders expecting to be exclusively working on green buildings, and 24% doing 61% to 90% green work. Remodelers are also increasing their attention to green work, with 16% reporting more than 60% of their projects are green today, expected to grow to 23% doing this amount of green remodeling in 2015 and 32% by 2018.

This spring McGraw Hill Construction will publish its 4th SmartMarket Report on the green home building marketplace, which will include these findings with additional analysis and new market research data on the trends of the multifamily builder. In the meantime, key findings from the study can be found at analyticsstore.construction.com/GreenHomeKeyFindings14.

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This article was published on January 20, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements, laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, visit www.OnlineEd.com

 

 

FREE Oregon Law and Rule Required Course (“LARRC”)

Free LARRC

Free LARRC

(Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd – Portland, OR) OnlineEd® is offering its Oregon Law and Rule Required Course (“LARRC”) for free! Released on January 1, 2014, the Oregon Real Estate Agency requires all Oregon Real Estate Licensees to complete this course as part of their continuing education for license renewal.   The course is found for FREE in the Oregon Real Estate Continuing Education Catalog at www.OnlineEd.com or by clicking here.  Sign up today, get started today!

OnlineEd is an Oregon owned and operated Oregon Department of Education licensed vocational school and Oregon Real Estate Agency Certified Continuing Education Provider No. 1038.

 

 

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 For more information about OnlineEd and their Oregon pre-license and continuing education courses for real estate licensees, please visit www.OnlineEd.com or telephone Chris Culbertson at 503.670.9278.OnlineEd is  Oregon owned and operated Oregon Real Estate Agency Certified Continuing Education Provider No. 1038.

This article was published on January 20, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements, laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

22% of Oregon Real Estate Licensees Fail Continuing Education Audit

(Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd) – The Oregon Real Estate Agency has released the results of its first continuing education audit, performed November 2013. A staggering 22% of the licensees audited failed because of fraudulent or altered certificates, courses completed from non-agency-certified continuing education providers, or not enough hours. Only 55% of the licensees met the agency’s audit requirements and appeared to be in compliance with all requirements for license renewal. The remaining 23% of licensees did not meet the audit requirements because of late or missing documentation. To renew a license without meeting the agency’s continuing education requirements is a violation of Oregon real estate license law and may result in administrative action against the licensee.

Oregon Real Estate Commissioner, Gene Bentley, suggests these key takeaway points from the results of this first audit:

  • Don’t renew your license until you have completed your required education;
  • Make sure your email and mailing addresses are up to date with the Agency to avoid missing important notifications;
  • Take your continuing education from Agency-certified providers;
  • Keep your certificates of attendance and Continuing Education Record form for three years after your license renewal; and
  • Don’t fraudulently produce or otherwise modify a continuing education certificate.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their Oregon pre-license and continuing education courses for real estate licensees, please visit www.OnlineEd.com or telephone Chris Culbertson at 503.670.9278.OnlineEd is an Oregon owned and operated Oregon Real Estate Agency Certified Continuing Education Provider No. 1038.

This article was published on January 2, 2014. All information contained in this posting is deemed correct and current as of this date, but is not guaranteed by the author. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements, laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

Oregon Real Estate Agency to Begin Licensee Continuing Education Audits

(Oregon Real Estate Agency) – The Oregon Real Estate Agency will be conducting continuing education audits. CE audits consist of reviewing the continuing education records of randomly selected real estate licensees who have recently renewed an active license.

canstockphoto2542469audit The first CE audit will begin November 1, 2013. Licensees will be randomly selected from all active license renewals in October 2013.

Required Records

Selected licensees will need to send in their continuing education records to the Agency for review. A licensee’s continuing education records include:

All licensees have been individually responsible for their own continuing education records since January 1, 2011. Licensees certify that they met the continuing education requirementswhen they renew their licenses.

Some real estate companies or businesses have policies that assist associated licensees with the maintenance of their continuing education records. Licensees still have the responsibility to maintain their records and to respond directly to a CE audit.

Lost Records

Licensees who believe they are missing earned certificates of attendance should contact their certified continuing education providers. The Agency cannot assist licensees in getting certificates from continuing education providers.

Failure to Respond to Audit or to Give Accurate Information

Licensees who are selected for a CE audit but do not respond may face administrative action. Licensees who are found to have provided inaccurate or incorrect information about the completion of continuing education may also be subject to administrative action. An administrative action can mean a reprimand, suspension, or revocation of the license.

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For more information about the Oregon Real Estate Agency or their audit procedures, please contact the Agency at (503) 378-4170 or orea.info@state.or.us with any questions.

How to Print a Copy of Your Oregon Real Estate License

(Jeff Sorg – OnlineEd®) – Follow these simple steps to access and print a copy of your Oregon real estate license:

  1. Log into eLicense at https://orea.elicense.irondata.com/
  2. Click on the Print License link in the menu to the left

orea print license